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Illustration Contracts: Editor's Notes #221
October 31, 2016
Hello,

"Creativity" is one of those words, or concepts, which seems plain enough, even simple,
till you start fixing your eye on it.
Then, like "innocence" or "internationalism" or "love,"
it begins to swell up like a cloud into something that fills the whole sky of meaning,
and darkens it, and comes to signify everything or nothing.

--Earle Birney


In this issue:

1. Illustration contracts for writers
2. Tickled my funnybone
3. Interesting Web site
4. Writing prompt

1. Illustration contracts for writers
Unless you are an artist, you need artwork for you book, even if it's just for the cover. If you write nonfiction, you may be expected to provide illustrations. If you self-publish anything, you have to provide illustrations. If you have a trade publisher, the publisher will usually look after the illustrations.

Here are some important considerations when writing or signing illustration contracts.

The contract spells out the cost and the timing of the payment. Expect to pay at least something up front. That protects the illustrator. Reserve some payment to the end of the job. That protects the writer or publisher.

The contract spells out the rights. In general, both the writer and the illustrator want as many rights as possible. If you sign a work-for-hire contract, the writer is likely to have more rights. That may mean you can use illustrations from the book for marketing purposes or anything else you like. At the other end of the scale, an illustrator may retain copyright and license the right to use the illustrations for a specific purpose. In this case, the illustrator may opt to reuse the illustrations. Of course, there are many points along the way between these two extremes. Expect to pay more for more rights.

It's fair to ask an illustrator to make revisions. A good contract sets out how many revisions are included in the price.

When you buy artwork for your book, know what you are getting, when you are getting it, and how much it will cost you before you put out any money. A solid contract protects you and the illustrator.

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2.Tickled my funnybone
From a church bulletin: The pastor would appreciate it if the ladies of the Congregation would lend him their electric girdles for the pancake breakfast next Sunday. 

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3. Interesting Web site
See a sample of an illustrator's contract...
http://www.illustrationcastle.com/blogimages/Contract_Template.pdf

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4. Writing prompt
Choose an illustrated book or a magazine. Open it and count five illustrations beyond the page you opened to. Focus on some detail in the illustration, and write about that for ten minutes.

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