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How to recognize publishing scams: Editor's Notes #214
July 15, 2016
Hello,

One must beware of ministers who can do nothing without money,
and those who want to do everything with money.

--Indira Gandhi


In this issue:

1. How to recognize publishing scams
2. Tickled my funnybone
3. Interesting Web site
4. Writing prompt
5. Letter to the editor

1. How to recognize publishing scams
You are a writer. Your area of expertise lies in crafting words that move, inform, or call others to action. You are probably not a graphic artist, a printer, a marketer, or a distributor. And even if you are an editor/writer like I am, you are not the best editor of your own work. This means that you probably will, and certainly should, hire at least some of the services listed above to give your book the best possible start in life.

Here is a list of ways to avoid those who prey on unwary writers:
  • Make contacts at writers' conferences. Presenters and advertisers are usually checked out by the group putting on the conference.
  • When you think you want to use a service, get references and check them. Better yet, see examples of work wherever possible.
  • Review offers with skepticism, and ask questions. Get the details. What is promised? Is it reasonable? If it's too good to be true, it's too good to be true. How long will the service take? How much will it cost? What is not included? What will happen if you are not happy with the result?
  • Check the organizations the service provider belongs to. Is the organization reputable? Many, like the Editors' Association of Canada I belong to, have a mediation service that helps with disputes and misunderstandings between members and their clients.
  • Finally, if someone else offers to market your book, be very, very wary. This is one service I've never heard a good word about, and I'm not new to this industry. Use all the free resources you can find online, do your research, and then dig in to do your own marketing. You may decide to outsource pieces of the job, but do so only after you fully understand what marketing a book entails and you have given the service provider your best scrutiny.


Go carefully and thoughtfully through the maze that is publishing. With the right research, you can find the team you need to bring your book to its finest polish and finally to market.

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2.Tickled my funnybone
They told me I had Type A blood, but it was a Type O.

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3. Interesting Web site
It's been a while since I've given a shout out to Preditors and Editors. They publish warnings about companies that prey on writers.
http://pred-ed.com/pubwarn.ht

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4. Writing prompt
Write down a number from five to ten. That is your word count for this prompt. Look up from your paper. Describe the first thing that catches your eye using the exact word count you just wrote down. If you have time and the inclination, massage that description, always staying on the exact count.

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5. Letter to the editor
Although I am not publishing the letter here, you should know that this issue is in response to a query from a new subscriber. I am always happy to hear from readers, and if you have a question, others probably do, too. Some of the answers to reader conundrums form the basis of topics I address here.

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Link on LinkedIn https://ca.linkedin.com/in/audreyowen (Email me first so I know how you know me.)

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