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Online magazines: Editor's Notes #194
September 15, 2015
Hello,

Writing is the only profession
where no one considers you ridiculous
if you earn no money.

--Jules Renard


In this issue:

1. Online magazines
2. Tickled my funnybone
3. Interesting Web site
4. Writing prompt

1. Online magazines
When casting around for places to publish, consider online magazines.

Online magazines, sometimes called ezines, abound. They cover almost any topic you can imagine. Literary ezines cater to every genre, including poetry.

When you have found an online magazine you want to write for, be sure to read several back issues to get a feel for what will fit the publication just as you would for a hard copy publication.

After ensuring that your writing is at least a probable fit, study the submission guidelines carefully and follow them to the letter.

In general, writing for an ezine requires a few special considerations. Large chunks of text are more difficult to read online than they are on a paper page. This means shorter paragraphs.

Some people think that because there is no space restriction on an electronic page, length doesn't matter. It does. In some cases, it matters more because many people have short attention spans online. Watch your word count.

Some online magazines offer an interactive experience. In that case, your submission may be bolstered by links to other sites, short videos, musical clips, or spoken words.

Although many ezines do not pay, many others do. In either case, being published anywhere can bolster your reputation in the writing world.

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2.Tickled my funnybone
From a church bulletin: Don't let worry kill you off - let the Church help.

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3. Interesting Web site
Poets & Writers has a huge searchable database of online magazines that seems to updated with some frequency. It's a good place to start, but do your own research into each publisher to verify the information.
http://www.pw.org/literary_magazines

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4. Writing prompt
I call this prompt The Link. Take up any publication near you; turn to a random page; choose a random sentence. That is your starting sentence. Turn to a second page, and choose a second random sentence. This is the conclusion of your piece. Go back and fill in the space between the sentences, making whatever links come to mind.

To save you time, I took two such sentences from a magazine I am reading. Begin: Those who care for me should know what I expect. End: Fields of cabbage, plantain, and potatoes blanket the valley.

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