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Making social media contact: Editor's Notes #184
April 15, 2015
Hello,

Be nice to people on your way up
because you meet them on your way down.

--Jimmy Durante


In this issue:

1. Making social media contact
2. Tickled my funnybone
3. Interesting Web site

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1.Making social media contact
Almost every morning I get up to discover people who want to establish a connection with me on social media. In my case, this is on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Each time this happens, I'm faced with a decision. Do I accept the friend, follow the tweeter, or link to the professional, or do I hit the delete button?

In this issue I tell you how I decide and offer tips to help you connect to those with higher privacy filters than I have.

On Facebook, I usually respond positively to anyone who asks. If the request comes from someone with a profile photo of a buff man young enough to be my grandson who says he loves my blue eyes, I report whoever sent the request. It's almost certainly not a buff young man, and it is definitely someone up to no good.

Not everyone on Facebook is as open to the public as I am. And even I appreciate a personal message that introduces the person who wants to connect. I make it a habit to send a message to someone I want to friend saying who I am and why I want to friend that particular person. I never assume the person knows anything about me unless that person has already commented on or liked something on my page.

On Twitter, I read the profile of every tweeter who follows me. If I like what I see, I hit the follow button. If I'm not sure, I go to the tweeter's full page and read a selection of tweets. If the tweeter seems even remotely related to my interests, I follow back. I do not follow anyone who simply posts over and over, "Buy my book," or "Hire me to XXX."

If I notice someone I want to follow, I usually just hit the follow button. But if I really want a relationship, I send a personal message or I ask a question about something the person has tweeted. This puts me on the radar of the new acquaintance.

I am most careful on LinkedIn. Both Facebook and Twitter are built on the concept of casting a wide net. LinkedIn is altogether different. The rules are that the linked people are to have had an actual connection. I often receive requests to link to people I have never heard of. I check my email files first, and if I have no record of the person there, and if I do not recognize the name, I delete the request.

If I want to link to someone whose newsletters I receive, I contact the person first by return email to say that I will be sending a LinkedIn request. That's because I know that newsletter email lists are managed by technology and the publisher of the newsletter will not recognize me even if I avidly read every issue.

The overarching principle of connecting through social media is to share something of who you are when asking for a connection.

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2.Tickled my funnybone
This girl said she recognized me from the vegetarian club, but I'd never met herbivore.

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3. Interesting Web site
Since LinkedIn clients generally follow the rules about linking only to known people, this is a good place to find and be found.
https://www.linkedin.com/

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Join Writer's Helper Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/WritersHelperEditor
Follow me on Twitter @AudreytheEditor
Link on LinkedIn https://ca.linkedin.com/in/audreyowen (Email me first so I know how you know me.)



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